mindblowingscience
thenewenlightenmentage:

Do We Live in a Multiverse?
By: Charles Choi
Our universe may not be alone. It could just be one of multiple realms making up a “multiverse.”
In fact, there are a half-dozen or so lines of reasoning that lead to this conclusion, with some pointing to the even wilder possibility that we live in a kind of multiverse-within-a-multiverse-within-a-multiverse.
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thenewenlightenmentage:

Do We Live in a Multiverse?

By: Charles Choi

Our universe may not be alone. It could just be one of multiple realms making up a “multiverse.”

In fact, there are a half-dozen or so lines of reasoning that lead to this conclusion, with some pointing to the even wilder possibility that we live in a kind of multiverse-within-a-multiverse-within-a-multiverse.

Continue Reading

mindblowingscience
sixpenceee:

Many people have no opinion or assume octopuses are stupid, spineless creatures.
But their brains are the largest of all the invertebrates. Their neurons are massed into lobes like ours. Their brains runs on a  a decentralized nervous system, two-thirds of which is distributed in the eight arms and legs.
Recent evidence shows that octopuses possess intelligence. For example, they can:
Open jars (video)

Mimic other sea creatures (video)

Did you know that when threatened, an octopus may turn white and puff up to scare the predator. It’ll then shoot ink to distract the predator and zig-zag through water to quickly camouflage itself among the coral. (Video)

In a test done by Oxford biologist N.S. Sutherland, Octopuses were given a treat if they picked one shape over the other. They soon learned that a rectangle was a rectangle no matter how it was oriented. 
Octopuses proved to have excellent memory. Scientific journals have publish research papers on octopus learning, octopus personality, octopus memory. Now the octopus has even made it into the pages of the journal Consciousness and Cognition.
It’s important to note that intelligence here, is defined in a different way. It’s suited towards their conditions and environment. 
(Source) (Source)

sixpenceee:

Many people have no opinion or assume octopuses are stupid, spineless creatures.

But their brains are the largest of all the invertebrates. Their neurons are massed into lobes like ours. Their brains runs on a  a decentralized nervous system, two-thirds of which is distributed in the eight arms and legs.

Recent evidence shows that octopuses possess intelligence. For example, they can:

Open jars (video)

Mimic other sea creatures (video)

Did you know that when threatened, an octopus may turn white and puff up to scare the predator. It’ll then shoot ink to distract the predator and zig-zag through water to quickly camouflage itself among the coral. (Video)

In a test done by Oxford biologist N.S. Sutherland, Octopuses were given a treat if they picked one shape over the other. They soon learned that a rectangle was a rectangle no matter how it was oriented. 

Octopuses proved to have excellent memory. Scientific journals have publish research papers on octopus learning, octopus personality, octopus memory. Now the octopus has even made it into the pages of the journal Consciousness and Cognition.

It’s important to note that intelligence here, is defined in a different way. It’s suited towards their conditions and environment. 

(Source) (Source)

mindblowingscience
libutron:

Pink Robin - Petroica rodinogaster
This chubby little bird is a male Pink Robin, Petroica rodinogaster (Passeriformes - Petroicidae). They are distinctive by having the throat and upperparts sooty black, and the breast and belly colored deep lilac-pink. Pink Robins Inhabit rainforest and tall, open eucalypt forest in Tasmania and the uplands of eastern Victoria and far south-eastern New South Wales (Australia).
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Charlie Price | Locality: Liffy Falls Carpark, Tasmania (2014)

libutron:

Pink Robin - Petroica rodinogaster

This chubby little bird is a male Pink Robin, Petroica rodinogaster (Passeriformes - Petroicidae). They are distinctive by having the throat and upperparts sooty black, and the breast and belly colored deep lilac-pink. Pink Robins Inhabit rainforest and tall, open eucalypt forest in Tasmania and the uplands of eastern Victoria and far south-eastern New South Wales (Australia).

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Charlie Price | Locality: Liffy Falls Carpark, Tasmania (2014)

mindblowingscience
mindblowingscience:

Astronomy Picture of the Day: October 1st, 2014

The Butterfly Nebula from Hubble 
Explanation: 
The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth’s night sky are often named for flowers or insects. Though its wingspan covers over 3 light-years, NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This sharp close-up of the dying star’s nebula was recorded in 2009 by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, and is presented here in reprocessed colors. Cutting across a bright cavity of ionized gas, the dust torus surrounding the central star is near the center of this view, almost edge-on to the line-of-sight. Molecular hydrogen has been detected in the hot star’s dusty cosmic shroud. NGC 6302 lies about 4,000 light-years away in the arachnologically correct constellation of the Scorpion (Scorpius).
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team; Reprocessing & Copyright: Francesco Antonucci

mindblowingscience:

Astronomy Picture of the Day: October 1st, 2014

The Butterfly Nebula from Hubble 

Explanation:

The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth’s night sky are often named for flowers or insects. Though its wingspan covers over 3 light-years, NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This sharp close-up of the dying star’s nebula was recorded in 2009 by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, and is presented here in reprocessed colors. Cutting across a bright cavity of ionized gas, the dust torus surrounding the central star is near the center of this view, almost edge-on to the line-of-sight. Molecular hydrogen has been detected in the hot star’s dusty cosmic shroud. NGC 6302 lies about 4,000 light-years away in the arachnologically correct constellation of the Scorpion (Scorpius).

Image Credit: NASAESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO TeamReprocessing & Copyright: Francesco Antonucci