mindblowingscience
mindblowingscience:

EVEN TINY DOSES OF RUNNING CAN EXTEND LIFESPAN

Even very brief running—just 5 to 10 minutes a day—can help people live longer, according to new research.
“Running is one of the most convenient and popular exercises,” says Duck-chul “D.C.” Lee, an assistant professor in kinesiology at Iowa State University.
“Running is good for your health—but more may not be better. You don’t have to think it’s a big challenge. We found that even 10 minutes per day is good enough. You don’t need to do a lot to get the benefits from running.”
The study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, finds that leisure-time runners are expected to live three years longer than non-runners.
The research shows that running can reduce a person’s all-cause mortality rate by 30 percent and cardiovascular mortality rate by 45 percent. This means that running can reduce all mortal health risks, such as cancer, stroke, and heart attack, by nearly a third. Cardiovascular risks are cut nearly in half.
People who ran less than an hour each week showed the same mortality benefits compared to those who ran more than three hours in each week, Lee says.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

EVEN TINY DOSES OF RUNNING CAN EXTEND LIFESPAN

Even very brief running—just 5 to 10 minutes a day—can help people live longer, according to new research.

“Running is one of the most convenient and popular exercises,” says Duck-chul “D.C.” Lee, an assistant professor in kinesiology at Iowa State University.

“Running is good for your health—but more may not be better. You don’t have to think it’s a big challenge. We found that even 10 minutes per day is good enough. You don’t need to do a lot to get the benefits from running.”

The study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, finds that leisure-time runners are expected to live three years longer than non-runners.

The research shows that running can reduce a person’s all-cause mortality rate by 30 percent and cardiovascular mortality rate by 45 percent. This means that running can reduce all mortal health risks, such as cancer, stroke, and heart attack, by nearly a third. Cardiovascular risks are cut nearly in half.

People who ran less than an hour each week showed the same mortality benefits compared to those who ran more than three hours in each week, Lee says.

Continue Reading.

the-actual-universe
afro-dominicano:


Alien Smog: How Pollution Could Help Locate E.T.

In the search for life beyond Earth, astronomers should look for signs of pollution in the atmospheres of alien planets outside the Earth’s solar system, a new study says.
The next-generation James Webb Space Telescope, which is set to launch in 2018, could hunt for worlds harboring alien life by sniffing their atmospheres for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), greenhouse gases that destroy ozone in the Earth’s atmosphere. These chemicals could be detected on planets with atmospheres that are 10 times thicker than Earth’s, the researchers said.
Scientists already scan the atmospheres of alien worlds for traces of oxygen and methane, gases that typically coexist in the presence of life. But searching for signs of pollution elsewhere in the universe could yield clues about more-advanced alien civilizations, the researchers said.
Of course, to very advanced civilizations, Earth’s own greenhouse gases might signal a primitive world, the scientists said.
"We consider industrial pollution as a sign of intelligent life, but perhaps civilizations more advanced than us, with their own SETI programs, will consider pollution as a sign of unintelligent life since it’s not smart to contaminate your own air," study leader Henry Lin, a student at Harvard University, said in a statement.

afro-dominicano:

Alien Smog: How Pollution Could Help Locate E.T.

In the search for life beyond Earth, astronomers should look for signs of pollution in the atmospheres of alien planets outside the Earth’s solar system, a new study says.

The next-generation James Webb Space Telescope, which is set to launch in 2018, could hunt for worlds harboring alien life by sniffing their atmospheres for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), greenhouse gases that destroy ozone in the Earth’s atmosphere. These chemicals could be detected on planets with atmospheres that are 10 times thicker than Earth’s, the researchers said.

Scientists already scan the atmospheres of alien worlds for traces of oxygen and methane, gases that typically coexist in the presence of life. But searching for signs of pollution elsewhere in the universe could yield clues about more-advanced alien civilizations, the researchers said.

Of course, to very advanced civilizations, Earth’s own greenhouse gases might signal a primitive world, the scientists said.

"We consider industrial pollution as a sign of intelligent life, but perhaps civilizations more advanced than us, with their own SETI programs, will consider pollution as a sign of unintelligent life since it’s not smart to contaminate your own air," study leader Henry Lin, a student at Harvard University, said in a statement.